Month: October 2013

‘IMpossible’

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When you look at the word “impossible”, the first thing you think of is that “it can’t be done.”  But when I look at it, I think and see two words:  “I’m Possible” – meaning that not just me but all of you are possible and capable of great things.  Including, spreading God’s word everywhere you go and to everyone you may meet! – Joe B.

Gracias – Grace is us!

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         Gracias is a Spanish word meaning thank you, but if you listen to it carefully you can hear another message:  grace is us. In a way this is true, because when we are baptized we receive the gift of Sanctifying Grace in our souls, and it then becomes a part of us. Sanctifying Grace is defined as “the supernatural life, which alone enables us to attain the supernatural happiness of Heaven”. When we keep that in mind we realize that we do not want to lose this precious gift, and therefore it effects what we think, say, and do. –Sarah

“Gracias” is grace…

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If you look at, and say the word, “gracias” you can see and hear the word “grace” in the middle of it. Gracias is the Spanish word for, “thank you,” so when we say “gracias” or thank you, we give grace. In giving grace, we receive God’s grace. So just by saying a mere thank you, we are recognized by the Lord himself and acknowledged for our generosity. The next time someone does something for you, make sure you tell them thanks, and realize that you are being thanked in return. –Jarod

Bishop tweets about the Paradox Youth Summit

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October 6  Bishop Malloy’s challenge to young people: “be proud of your Catholic Faith do great deeds that only the young can do.”

Do you know which Pope invented a calendar? How about the Vatican Observatory?

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The Gregorian calendar (used today in most of the world) was issued in 1582.  Pope Gregory XIII was annoyed by the Julian calendar (since 45 B.C. and off by 11 days).  Almost simultaneously, he ordered the establishment of a Vatican astronomy laboratory to study the sun.  Pope Leo XIII in 1891 formally refounded the Specola Vaticana (Vatican Observatory) and located it on a hillside behind the dome of St. Peter’s Basilica.  The city lights interfered with seeing the stars, so Pope Pius XI provided a new location for the Observatory at the Papal Summer Residence at Castel Gandolfo in the Alban Hills some 25 kilometers southeast of Rome.

In 1981, for the first time in its history, the Observatory founded a second research center, the Vatican Observatory Research Group (VORG), in Tucson, Arizona in the United States, one of the world’s largest and most modern centers for observational astronomy. In 1993, the Observatory, in collaboration with Steward Observatory, completed the construction of the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT, first optical-infrared telescope and pioneering new technology with international collaboration) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, probably the best astronomical site in the Continental United States.  (For more information, go to www.vaticanobservatory.org)

The dedication plaque of the VATT reads:  This new tower for studying the stars has been erected during the XV year of the reign of John Paul II on this peaceful site so fit for such studies, and it has been equipped with a new large mirror for detecting the faintest glimmers of light from distant objects. May whoever searches here night and day the far reaches of space use it joyfully with the help of God.

Do you have plans and dreams?

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Tweet:  The Pope asks some great questions:

Pope Francis ‏@Pontifex  5 Oct

Dear young people, you have many plans and dreams for the future. But, is Christ at the center of each of your plans and dreams?