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The Ark Encounter

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In the news:

Noahs Ark

They actually built the boat!  It’s a 510 foot-long wooden ark that is in a theme park in Kentucky!

http://tinyurl.com/hv4lsqk

Also:

Mosaics depicting prominent Bible scenes were uncovered during annual excavations of an ancient synagogue in Israel’s Lower Galilee.

http://tinyurl.com/hmbrqtf

Check that Bible story out in Genesis Chapters 6-9!

 

My Light Saber

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A priest who makes his own light saber?  You betcha.  And soon he will be a bishop!Line Shepherd

Deep in the heart of Texas, a campus chaplain is busy making his final spiritual and practical preparations for becoming a bishop.  However, unlike many of his soon-to-be brother-bishops, Fr. David Konderla is carving his very own staff – or crosier – to signify his new position and duty as a teacher and head of a diocese.

“Every Jedi has not completed his training until he’s made his own light saber that he uses to fight evil with – so this is my light saber,” Bishop-elect David Konderla told CNA in an interview.

You probably never thought of a priest or a bishop as a Jedi.  And you probably never thought that they would need a light saber although they do fight evil.  For Fr. Konderla it’s a symbol of his role as a bishop.  How does he make a crosier?  What does it stand for?

A crosier is a hooked staff – based on the shape of a shepherd’s staff – carried by bishops in the Catholic Church to symbolize their pastoral function in the Church. Other important symbols of a bishop’s position are the pectoral cross worn on a bishop’s chest, the mitre- or hat, and the episcopal ring.

Fr. Konderla saved wood from trees that were taken down to build a parish center. “I was able to incorporate some of that wood into this crosier so it will have that special meaning.”

The crosier has a bottom section that is detachable so that you can travel with it. The hook is a little trickier to make. Fr. Konderla takes thinly-sliced strips of wood that are softened with steam from a kettle on his stovetop.  After they soften, he quickly bends them around a form and lets them cool.  Then they can be glued together to form an “ugly” square piece of wood that is whittled and smoothed until it takes the form of a hook. He will use different woods in the same process to make three rings of wood that he sees as “representing the trinity.”  Then the staff will be stained and polished.

Fr. Konderla and his brother, a jeweler, are working together to design and make a ring based on St. Pope John Paul II’s fisherman’s ring. The ring includes gold from their mother’s wedding ring and incorporates his devotions to the Sacred Heart, Divine Mercy and Mary.

Fr. Konderla said that this project of creating the crosier and ring are reflecting the beauty that God creates in the world. “Art is expressive of the divine,” and woodwork in particular is an art form that must respect God’s own beautiful creations, he said.  He will be setting up his workshop in his new garage as a bishop!

Everything in our Church has meaning from the stained glass to the vestments that the Priest wears.  Our homes say a lot about us from the colors we like to the style of furniture.  We wear different styles of clothing or jewelry. Do you have your Grandmother’s favorite teapot?  Maybe something that belonged to your great-grandparents?  As Christians, we all choose how we show our faith.  I wear a cross and a few Saint medals.  I have crosses in my home and religious pictures among the many of family or art that I have created.  I also have treasures that have been handed down in my family.  All of those are carried with me like the bishop’s crosier.  They ‘shepherd’ and guide me through life just like the shepherd’s staff.  Our challenge is to be good shepherds to those around us.

Here are some staffs from our popes:

Pope Francis Crosier 2

Pope Francis looks pretty serious here as he listens intently.  He has asked us to show mercy to each other, especially our families and listen to the poor.  He wants us to make a difference in the world around us!

 

 

 

Pope Benedict XVI is smiling! Pope Benedict Crosier Blog

 

Out of This World

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Check out this article about astronauts who take their faith into space and even take Communion with them!  Full CNS Article

Here are some excerpts:astronaut-back-clip-art-page-2-pics-about-space

“When you see the Earth from that vantage point and see all the natural beauty that exists, it’s hard not to sit there and realize there has to be a higher power that has made this,” said Hopkins, who is Catholic.

Astronaut Mike Good, a member of St. Paul the Apostle Parish in Nassau Bay, Texas, near NASA’s Johnson Space Center, and a veteran of two space flights, spent about 12 days on each of his missions aboard the space shuttle. Taking Communion into space, he said, was not as imperative.

“It just makes it so obvious that God created this beautiful place. The word awe just comes to mind. … And looking out into space, it’s just a clear view. The stars don’t twinkle. It’s like a high definition 3-D TV. You look out into space and feel very small.”

Good, a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, expects that when the moment of launch comes, there’s a feeling of connection with God or a higher power among just about everyone heading to space.

Among the things Massimino took on his first flight was a Vatican City flag, which he later gave to St. John Paul II. On his second flight, he took a prayer card depicting Pope Benedict XVI, which he gave to the pontiff.

Hopkins, Good and Massimino took mementos, including religious items, from their schools, parishes and friends into space.

To keep astronauts’ spirits high, NASA arranges for occasional calls with celebrities on flights and asks each astronaut with whom they might like to talk. Vande Hei, who holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from St. John’s University in Minnesota, said he suggested Pope Francis.

His request may not be outside the realm of possibility. Pope Benedict communicated with the crew aboard the ISS in May 2011 in a 20-minute conversation.

An ancient Basilica under Water!

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FB Post from  Fr. James Martin, SJ

I love this photo, and this story. Anyone who has ever said the Nicene Creed at Mass on Sunday (i.e., every Catholic) will know the name of Nicea. This beautiful underwater ruins could be the long-lost Church of St. Peter, from the early sixth century. A loose translation of this article reads, in part: “A team of Turkish archaeologists announced that they had discovered the remains of a 1,500-year-old basilica at the bottom of Lake Iznik, in the northwestern province of Bursa. According to some experts, it could be the Byzantine church of St. Peter, cited in various Christian texts of the time. According to Mustafa Sahin, professor of archaeology at the University of Bursa, who directs the excavations, the basilica was built around 500 AD. In the nearby town of Nicaea (now Iznik) in 325 was held the first ecumenical council of the Christian world, under the chairmanship of Emperor Constantine.”

Do you know which Pope invented a calendar? How about the Vatican Observatory?

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The Gregorian calendar (used today in most of the world) was issued in 1582.  Pope Gregory XIII was annoyed by the Julian calendar (since 45 B.C. and off by 11 days).  Almost simultaneously, he ordered the establishment of a Vatican astronomy laboratory to study the sun.  Pope Leo XIII in 1891 formally refounded the Specola Vaticana (Vatican Observatory) and located it on a hillside behind the dome of St. Peter’s Basilica.  The city lights interfered with seeing the stars, so Pope Pius XI provided a new location for the Observatory at the Papal Summer Residence at Castel Gandolfo in the Alban Hills some 25 kilometers southeast of Rome.

In 1981, for the first time in its history, the Observatory founded a second research center, the Vatican Observatory Research Group (VORG), in Tucson, Arizona in the United States, one of the world’s largest and most modern centers for observational astronomy. In 1993, the Observatory, in collaboration with Steward Observatory, completed the construction of the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT, first optical-infrared telescope and pioneering new technology with international collaboration) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, probably the best astronomical site in the Continental United States.  (For more information, go to www.vaticanobservatory.org)

The dedication plaque of the VATT reads:  This new tower for studying the stars has been erected during the XV year of the reign of John Paul II on this peaceful site so fit for such studies, and it has been equipped with a new large mirror for detecting the faintest glimmers of light from distant objects. May whoever searches here night and day the far reaches of space use it joyfully with the help of God.